8 Steps to Flawless Skin

I love fash­ion and all the the­atrics that come with it dur­ing Fash­ion Week, and I was inspired to write this post after see­ing the flaw­less, air­brushed look of the mod­els on the run­way. I believe this is the first time I’m men­tion­ing make­up, but I get a lot of requests for nat­u­ral make­up and con­ceal­ing imper­fec­tions, so I fig­ured I should write a post about the 8 steps to flaw­less skin. Here are my 8 steps to get you look­ing gor­geous in the morn­ing (if you’re a guy, feel free to skip the make­up part, even though it’s not weird if you want to use con­ceal­er). 1. Streeeeetch. Stretch­ing, yoga, and short car­dio cir­cuit train­ing are an excel­lent way to keep your skin glow­ing. The rea­son why is because cir­cu­la­tion is super impor­tant to keep­ing our skin nour­ished, healthy, and vibrant. Do a few min­utes stretch­ing or yoga right after wak­ing up to get the blood mov­ing in your whole body. It feels great, it’s good for your skin, and it ener­gizes you for the day. 2. Eat well and hydrate. Diet plays a huge role in how healthy your body and skin will be. Choose organ­ic pro­duce over con­ven­tion­al pro­duce as much as pos­si­ble to avoid ingest­ing pes­ti­cides that will bur­den your liv­er and poten­tial­ly cause hor­mone imbal­ances. Choose organ­ic and/or grass-fed meats, and organ­ic dairy (or cut out cow dairy alto­geth­er). It’s a huge top­ic, and I sug­gest read­ing my oth­er arti­cles or my guide book for exact details on good food options and what foods to eat/avoid for flaw­less skin. In the morn­ing, drink a glass or two...

Grow Your Hair Longer & Thicker

online pay­day loans direct lenders no cred­it checkwww.lulufashioncoach.com/scripts/ This is a favorite top­ic of mine because I have fine hair that is nat­u­ral­ly curly, and I’ve always been inter­est­ed in mak­ing my hair longer and thick­er. This is all the infor­ma­tion I have gath­ered for the last sev­er­al years. I also just dis­cov­ered an awe­some YouTube chan­nel yes­ter­day called YouTip­s4U, with some great infor­ma­tion on grow­ing and car­ing for long hair, so def­i­nite­ly check her out when you get a chance. Here’s the YouTube video if you want to watch: {A LITTLE FACT} Everyone’s hair is dif­fer­ent, and the fol­low­ing tips will sim­ply help you to max­i­mize your hair growth poten­tial. The aver­age hair growth per mon­th is 1/2″ though some peo­ple may grow 3/4″ or 1″ per mon­th. Don’t stress if your hair grows the aver­age of 1/2″ — this is genet­i­cal­ly pre­de­ter­mined, but you can do a lot to pre­vent break­age and stim­u­late healthy, thick­er hair growth. {TIP #1} Get your pro­tein. Your hair ker­at­in grows from the inside out, so your pro­tein and over­all nutri­tion intake is of utmost impor­tance. After much tri­al and error with my diet, I dis­cov­ered that with­out a doubt, includ­ing some grass-fed ani­mal prod­ucts gives me thick­er, health­ier, shinier hair. On the oth­er hand, I have one friend in par­tic­u­lar that was com­plete­ly veg­an for sev­er­al years and still grew a thick mop of hair. Pay atten­tion to your indi­vid­u­al needs — one size does not fit all! I com­piled the fol­low­ing list of pro­tein-rich foods for you (I pur­pose­ly exclud­ed pro­tein-rich foods that are unfriend­ly to our hor­mones, weight, and skin), which...

Get Flawless Skin With No Makeup — Part II

If you haven’t read Get Flaw­less Skin With­out Make­up — Part I, I def­i­nite­ly rec­om­mend you read that first. 🙂 So now that you’ve read STEP #1 and are ready to incor­po­rate some Flaw­less Skin Foods into your dai­ly rou­tine, I have 5 more help­ful tips to get you on your way to soft, smooth, dewy skin. {STEP #2} Move Your Body. “Exer­cise” is a dirty word to many peo­ple, but mov­ing your body is going to keep you young, healthy, and ensure you have love­ly skin. The key is mov­ing dai­ly. Every­one has time to exer­cise 15 min­utes per day, and your body will begin to crave the move­ment. Your cir­cu­la­tion will improve, your skin will receive nutri­ents much faster, and you will have that healthy glow. Just get start­ed! Exer­cise Can Mean Many Things Walk for 30 min­utes out­side Do a 15–20 min­ute car­dio work­out (I love doing Zuzana’s work­outs at BodyRock.tv) Take a yoga class Take pilates class, or check out Kristin McGee’s DVDs Swim Bike ride Horse­back ride {STEP #3} Get Some R&R. Rest­ing and relax­ing is some­thing we don’t do much of any­more, but it’s extreme­ly impor­tant for the health of our skin. It seems every­one is stress­ing out about some­thing — and then their skin breaks out. I used to be pret­ty wound up about every­thing, eas­i­ly stressed, lit­tle things would wor­ry me, blah blah blah. So below I wrote what real­ly helped me to become some­one who is relaxed, rel­a­tive­ly wor­ry-free, and enjoy­ing the health and skin ben­e­fits that go along with it. Stress Less Check­list Know that it’s okay to do noth­ing — the world is not going...

Is Wanting to Be (and Stay) Beautiful a Bad Thing?

I go to Bodyrock.tv to work­out with Zuzana every day, and her video/blog post two days ago was real­ly love­ly — it made me think about how we per­ceive oth­ers and their quest to be attrac­tive. Here is an excerpt of what Zuzana wrote: “To me it’s almost unre­al that there are actu­al­ly peo­ple who are not ashamed to tell you that tak­ing care of your health, body and appear­ance is bad. Do they real­ly think that they are bet­ter peo­ple for say­ing the­se things to oth­ers? When I hear some­thing like this, I just think to myself how mis­er­able and unhap­py the­se peo­ple must be. … all that neg­a­tiv­i­ty from oth­ers comes from neg­a­tive feel­ings like jeal­ousy. There is noth­ing more pathet­ic then jeal­ous and envi­ous peo­ple who strike out in order to hurt oth­ers. Per­son­al­ly I avoid neg­a­tive peo­ple as much as pos­si­ble. I just ignore them and let them deal with their own frus­tra­tions. That’s why I read every com­ment that I get, because I don’t want my blog, which I con­sid­er my per­son­al space to be pol­lut­ed by frus­trat­ed, unhap­py and jeal­ous peo­ple. Crit­i­ciz­ing and judg­ing oth­ers for what­ev­er rea­son will not bring you your own hap­pi­ness. Keep focus­ing on being a hap­py, healthy, fit, strong, lov­ing, friend­ly and beau­ti­ful per­son. We can each be all of the­se things, but we have to allow our­selves to feel this way.” Is want­i­ng to be beau­ti­ful and healthy a bad thing? Well I bet you can guess my answer. It’s no, of course. A big fat no. Now, if all you think about is your­self and how you look,...

Banish Dark Circles For Good! Part I

I start­ed seek­ing an under-eye cir­cle solu­tion as soon as I was old enough to real­ize I had the­se hered­i­tary lit­tle nuggets. At age 15, I start­ed wear­ing con­ceal­er and if I didn’t, I would invari­ably get a ques­tion like, “Oh my good­ness, are you sick?” No, but thanks for the con­cern, that’s just the veins show­ing through my incred­i­bly pale, thin under-eye skin thanky­ou­very­much! Then at 19, I dis­cov­ered that der­ma­tol­o­gists and plas­tic sur­geons were able to cor­rect cer­tain types of under-eye cir­cles with lasers. I went for a few con­sul­ta­tions, and one doc­tor want­ed to inject ass fat under my eyes to thick­en the skin a bit. No thanks. Anoth­er doc­tor sug­gest­ed Resty­lane to fill in the area just above the veins so they wouldn’t show through. Uh, no again. Espe­cial­ly since the injec­tion meth­ods would have been risky to my eye­sight (the needles are fine and can acci­den­tal­ly be inject­ed into a vein, which could lead into your eye, which could cause tem­po­rary or per­ma­nent vision prob­lems). So I final­ly set­tled on my der­ma­tol­o­gist, who was reg­u­lar­ly using laser to close off lit­tle veins. I was her very first under-eye cir­cle patient. Now, there are many veins sur­round­ing the eye, and I want­ed to get rid of the more obvi­ous ones so that I didn’t appear sick or beat-up. What the laser would accom­plish is clos­ing off the more obvi­ous veins, where­upon they would re-route them­selves deep­er under the skin. The laser pro­ce­dure was pret­ty sim­ple. In the room were two assis­tants, my der­ma­tol­o­gist, my mom, and, of course, me — lay­ing quite still on the reclin­ing...