A Complete Guide to the Best Natural Face Oils [Infographic]

A Complete Guide to the Best Natural Face Oils [Infographic]

Face and body oils are a cen­turies old beau­ty tra­di­tion. They are lux­u­ri­ous, antibac­te­ri­al, pro­tec­tive, and high­ly mois­tur­iz­ing. In the recent past, oil got a bad rap and oil-free prod­ucts reigned supre­me. How­ev­er, the oils that were caus­ing all the trou­ble were (and still are) syn­thet­ic or unwhole­some processed oils that can clog pores and unbal­ance the skin’s oil pro­duc­tion. Now that peo­ple are start­ing to come around on the sub­ject and learn the dif­fer­ence between good oils and bad oils, oil-based cleansers, mois­tur­iz­ers, and serums are mak­ing a huge come­back. The amount of face oils now on the mar­ket now is stag­ger­ing, but a lot of them are the typ­i­cal fluff in a pret­ty bot­tle. As usu­al, I am here to help you wade through the mish­mash and make a great choice for your skin.

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Download the PDF Face Oil Guide Here

Download the JPG Face Oil Guide Here

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Why Face Oils are Perfect

Our skin loves fat. LOVES it. Which makes sense, since our skin pro­duces its own fat (sebum) that acts to pro­tect our skin from out­side assailants (bac­te­ria, fungi, funky weath­er). Oils are pro­tec­tive and help main­tain the integri­ty of our skin’s acid mantle, which keeps out bad bac­te­ria and pre­vents blem­ish­es, dry­ness, and irri­ta­tion. Keep­ing the skin hydrat­ed and sup­ple also speeds up heal­ing, so if you have a break­out or a rash or der­mati­tis, a prop­er face oil will do won­ders. Dewy, plump skin is a result of hydra­tion, from both water and fat­ty acids. If you’ve ever made your own aro­mather­a­py treat­ments, you may have heard the term “car­ri­er oil.” That is because oils are used for deliv­er­ing active ingre­di­ents into the skin – effec­tive­ly and with­out irri­ta­tion.

What to Look For in a Face Oil

Most impor­tant­ly, look for unre­fined, min­i­mal­ly processed oils from a com­pa­ny with a good back­ground and solid ethics. Green­wash­ing is preva­lent, and you don’t want to end up with an oil that looks good on paper but doesn’t deliv­er when you use it. You also need to avoid addi­tives and oils pro­duced with chem­i­cals and bleach­ing (those byprod­ucts, such as hexa­ne, end up in the oil and on your skin). Look for organ­ic cer­ti­fi­ca­tions or organ­i­cal­ly grown pledges, as well as words like “cold processed” or “unre­fined.” Avoid ingre­di­ents that sim­ply say “fra­grance” since that can mean it is a syn­thet­ic fra­grance and con­tains phtha­lates (endocrine/hormone-disrupting chem­i­cals). Fun, right? Sen­si­tive skin types should also avoid linalool and limonene, which are com­mon scent addi­tives usu­al­ly list­ed at the very end of ingre­di­ents labels. They are not inher­ent­ly bad, it’s just that sen­si­tive types don’t always agree with them.

How to Use Face Oils

Apply your facial oil to your fresh­ly washed face. Make sure your skin is still a bit damp from the water or your alco­hol-free ton­er. Facial oils are much eas­ier to spread on damp skin, and will also hold the remain­ing water to the skin for deep­er hydra­tion. The best way to apply a facial oil is to dis­pense on or two drops on a fin­ger­tip, spread the oil across your fin­ger­tips, and then pat your fin­ger­tips in quick suc­ces­sion all over your face and neck. Just pat pat pat all over your skin. No need to mas­sage it in. Your warm fin­ger­tips alone will help the oil sink in quick­ly and dis­pense prop­er­ly all over your skin.

Best Face Oils for Your Skin Type

Down­load the info­graph­ic to find out! Click here to down­load the nat­u­ral face oils info­graph­ic PDF or click here to down­load the nat­u­ral face oils info­graph­ic in JPG for­mat.

A Note on Face Oils for Oily & Acne-Prone Skin

Face oils are amaz­ing for oily and acne-prone skin because they help reg­u­late oil pro­duc­tion and are antibac­te­ri­al. Peo­ple with oily skin tend to strip too much oil from their faces through over­wash­ing or using dry­ing skin prod­ucts. This only caus­es the skin to pro­duce more oil to com­pen­sate and leaves the skin’s bar­ri­er weak and vul­ner­a­ble to bac­te­ria (such as p.acnes acne bac­te­ria). You can restore bal­ance and nat­u­ral­ly slow down sebum pro­duc­tion by using qual­i­ty oils. Seed oils are best for oily skin because they tend to pen­e­trate quick­er and leave a very sub­tle dewy fin­ish (or even a more mat­te fin­ish, which argan tends to provide) instead of look­ing or being greasy.

Recommended Facial Oils

I recent­ly launched Epic Beau­ty Bar, where I curate and car­ry only the very best, exquis­ite nat­u­ral brands. Thus, most of the prod­ucts I rec­om­mend are avail­able on EBB. If they’re not avail­able there yet, then I have linked you to where you can eas­i­ly pur­chase the cor­rect facial oil for you. If you need help pick­ing out an oil, leave a com­ment and I will help you.

Lina Han­son Glob­al Face Serum (ide­al for dry, sen­si­tive, mature, and stressed skin)

Acure Argan Oil (ide­al for all skin types – espe­cial­ly oily and acne-prone skin – though very dry skin may need addi­tion­al mois­ture)

MUN No. 1 Aknari Night­time Dream Youth Serum (ide­al for all skin types, though very dry skin may feel the need for addi­tion­al mois­ture)

La Bel­la Fig­u­ra Bar­bary Fig Seed Oil (ide­al for sun dam­aged, stressed, irri­tat­ed, or hor­mon­al skin)

May Lind­strom Skin The Youth Dew (ide­al for all skin types, espe­cial­ly hor­mon­al, sun dam­aged, and mature skin)

Dr. Alkaitis Nour­ish­ing Treat­ment Oil (ide­al for all skin types)

Skin Apotheke Radi­ance Renewal Face Oil (ide­al for anti-aging, dull, sun dam­aged, and acne-prone skin)

Eliz­a­beth Dehn for One Love Organ­ics Active Mois­ture Vit­a­m­in C Serum (ide­al for sun dam­age, dehy­dra­tion, fine lines, wrin­kles, and hyper­pig­men­ta­tion)

One Love Organ­ics Super­crit­i­cal Chia Oil (ide­al for sen­si­tive, dam­aged, flaky, stressed skin or those with der­mati­tis, eczema, or in help­ing to heal oth­er skin dis­or­ders caused by weak­ened skin bar­ri­er func­tion)

This guide will be updat­ed fair­ly reg­u­lar­ly! Leave a com­ment if you have ques­tions or need help. 🙂
~Steph  x

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