How to Do an At-Home Facial

How to Do an At-Home Facial

Whether you are bat­tling the last rem­nants of acne, sub­clin­i­cal acne (lit­tle bumps with­out heads), black­heads, or sim­ply want to take your skin con­di­tion to the next lev­el, a great facial will do won­ders. I high­ly rec­om­mend treat­ing your­self to at-home facials or pro­fes­sion­al facials from a licensed aes­theti­cian. I now make sure to treat myself to a pro­fes­sion­al facial at least once per mon­th and I do at-home facials every week (except for the week I receive a pro facial) to close­ly mim­ic the pro­fes­sion­al ones I receive. Reg­u­lar prop­er facials will pre­vent break­outs and black­heads, speed heal­ing, slow aging, and provide con­cen­trat­ed nutri­tion to the skin. I know sev­er­al old­er wom­en (50s, 60s, and beyond) with beau­ti­ful skin that looks far younger than their actu­al years, and they all cred­it it to excel­lent skin care, reg­u­lar skin treat­ments, and of course, stay­ing out of the sun. Like we haven’t heard that before. 😉 And just to clar­i­fy, I am def­i­nite­ly not say­ing that you have to do facials every week or even every mon­th to have beau­ti­ful skin. I went with­out facials for years and my diet and basic skin care rou­tine alone kept my skin clear and glow­ing. How­ev­er, I do reg­u­lar facials because I enjoy it (like a hob­by haha), I put aside the time, and it gives my skin that extra boost. Below is my at-home semi-pro facial. Take 30–60 min­utes and treat your­self to this lux­u­ri­ous rou­tine. Do It Yourself At-Home Facial Routine A Note on Prod­ucts: To make it easy on you, I rec­om­mend a few prod­ucts for each step and skin type. There...
30 Minute Ritual for Baby Soft Skin

30 Minute Ritual for Baby Soft Skin

I went to a spa yes­ter­day (day 7 of my CLEAN cleanse) for some relax­ation and TLC, which came high­ly rec­om­mend­ed by the CLEAN team (and I am not about to argue with a spa day). I hit it off with my won­der­ful ther­a­pist, who had gor­geous skin and a skin care phi­los­o­phy to match. I dis­cov­ered that she hailed from the Ukraine, and that she and all the wom­en in her fam­i­ly use a a sim­ple, lux­u­ri­ous rit­u­al for the most amaz­ing­ly soft, smooth skin all over. In her exact words: “Your skin will be soft like baby for a week!” She did a sim­i­lar treat­ment for me at the spa, and my skin looks and feels incred­i­ble. I almost can’t stand it. She shared every­thing about the 30 min­ute rit­u­al with me, so I turned around and detailed it below for you. Shar­ing is car­ing. 😉 You will need the fol­low­ing sup­plies for Step One – Bathe: Fil­tered water 1 cup Epsom salts 2 Tbsp. full-fat coconut milk You will need the fol­low­ing sup­plies for Step Two – Scrub: 3 Tbsp. organ­ic corn­meal (you can also use sea salt or sug­ar instead) 1 Tbsp. of olive oil and/or grape­seed oil Squeeze of lemon 1 Tbsp. hon­ey Mix togeth­er to form a smooth, spread­able paste. Adjust ratios as need­ed. You will need the fol­low­ing sup­plies for Step Three – Mois­tur­ize: Body oil (home­made or store bought) Home­made Recipe: My favorite home­made body oil recipe: com­bine 1/4 cup macadamia nut oil, 1/4 cup olive oil, 1/4 cup + 1 Tbsp. apri­cot ker­nel oil, 1 Tbsp. sea buck­thorn oil, and about 20–30 drops of essen­tial oils (I...
DIY Deodorant

DIY Deodorant

While body odor is attrib­ut­ed to a not-so-healthy diet, it can also hap­pen when you’re stressed or anx­ious. Many health prac­ti­tion­ers will tell you that your sweat should not stink, but it’s always nice to have a lit­tle insur­ance just in case. Before I get into the oh-so-easy DIY deodor­ant recipes, here is a real­ly brief list of foods that will cause and inhibit body odor. Foods Attrib­ut­ed to Body Odor Junk/fast food, processed meats, con­ven­tion­al meats. Processed snack foods high in sug­ar and refined grains. Onions and gar­lic can also cause an odor – the amount that caus­es an odor varies on an indi­vid­u­al basis, and may just end up smelling like gar­lic, not body odor. Foods that Pre­vent Body Odor All leafy greens! Kale, spinach, baby greens, romaine, pars­ley, cilantro, etc. Cucum­ber, cel­ery, mint, and lemon. Sprouts. Sup­ple­men­tal chloro­phyll. I like to make my own deodor­ant, and some­times I buy it (my favorite is Ele­gant Rose Bou­tique on Etsy). Below are my two recipes for all nat­u­ral, super effec­tive deodor­ant (works on men and wom­en). Recipe #1 Actu­al­ly not a recipe at all. If I’m lazy, I just swipe my under­arms with some alu­minum-free bak­ing soda. If I use too much or the reg­u­lar (not alu­min­im-free) bak­ing soda, I get an itchy rash that goes away in a day or two. I have sim­ply learned to only use the good stuff. Recipe #2 This one is so nice and mois­tur­iz­ing, and allows for some cre­ativ­i­ty in the func­tion and fra­grance of essen­tial oils. How much you sweat, fra­grance pref­er­ences, and skin sen­si­tiv­i­ty is a very indi­vid­u­al thing, so alter this recipe as...
Best Dairy & Soy Substitutes

Best Dairy & Soy Substitutes

Dairy and soy often con­tribute to break­outs, due in part to the hor­mones present in the­se foods (and dairy’s ten­den­cy to spike insulin) that can dis­rupt your own hor­mon­al bal­ance. Acne is an inflam­ma­to­ry con­di­tion – you need to remove the cause of the inflam­ma­tion for the inflam­ma­tion to go down and the skin to heal. “…dairy still has casein (pro­tein) that looks like gluten to our immune sys­tem. That means…milk still stim­u­lates immune sys­tem prob­lems. For those with food allergies / sen­si­tiv­i­ties it is still a major prob­lem. Once sen­si­tized — always sen­si­tized. I avoid and strong­ly urge all with an a chron­ic dis­ease or autoim­mune dis­ease to AVOID.”– Dr. Ter­ry Wahls, M.D. Aside from sev­er­al stud­ies done in the past few years that show a marked decrease in acne after remov­ing dairy/soy/grains (not all at once), I have had hun­dreds of indi­vid­u­als email me that fol­low­ing the Epic Beau­ty Guide food guide­li­nes has com­plete­ly cleared up their skin. Don’t knock it til you try it! In case you’re unfa­mil­iar with the guide­li­nes, here is a brief overview (there are tons of detailed arti­cles on the site and in the book). Focus on fresh, whole, unprocessed foods as much as pos­si­ble. Think grass-fed meats, wild-caught seafood, organ­ic veg­gies, and organ­ic fruits. (Side Note: It’s not hard, it’s not bor­ing or taste­less, and it doesn’t take long to make your own fresh meal. It took me 10 min­utes to make din­ner last night, and it was a deli­cious grass-fed steak mar­i­nat­ed in fresh­ly minced gar­lic and spices, with steamed organ­ic broc­coli on the side. Deli­cious and super healthy.) Dairy and soy are com­mon...

Tasty Skin-Clearing Green Drink

Hey every­one! I have always been impressed with the ben­e­fits of green tea, but could nev­er stand the taste of it plain. I would always order it and then some­one would say, “but Steph, remem­ber you don’t like green tea…” Oh yeah. Until I dis­cov­ered matcha. Matcha green tea is the dried, pow­dered ver­sion of green tea. It is grown in the shade (and/or moved to the shade for a few weeks pri­or to it being har­vest­ed), mak­ing for a sweet­er taste and more amino acids. Matcha con­tains a bevy of ben­e­fi­cial sub­stances, includ­ing the amino acid l-thea­nine, which has a calm­ing effect and mit­i­gates the effects of stress and cor­ti­sol on our bod­ies. Fur­ther, matcha low­ers cho­les­terol lev­els and pre­vents gly­ca­tion, which is respon­si­ble for loss of elas­tic­i­ty (wrin­kles, sag­ging) in our skin and dam­age to our organs. In 2003, researchers at Uni­ver­si­ty of Col­orado deter­mined that the “con­cen­tra­tion of epi­gal­lo­cat­e­ch­in gal­late (EGCG) avail­able from drink­ing matcha is 137 times greater than the amount of EGCG avail­able from Chi­na Green Tips green tea, and at least three times high­er than the largest lit­er­a­ture val­ue for oth­er green teas” (empha­sis mine). In case you’re won­der­ing, EGCG is the can­cer-inhibit­ing, anti-inflam­ma­to­ry, neu­ro­pro­tec­tive antiox­i­dant that com­pris­es 60% of matcha. When you pur­chase matcha, make sure it’s cer­e­mo­ni­al grade because you will get the most bang for your buck – the most amino acids, the most EGCG, the best and sweet­est fla­vor, etc. Matcha has a great taste on its own, but my favorite way to con­sume it is in the form of a deli­cious lat­te. Check out my very own EBG green lat­te...

Clear Skin Chocolate Mini Cakes

Hey every­one! I’ve been bak­ing up a storm late­ly, mak­ing deli­cious grain-free treats that I’ve been test­ing on my unsus­pect­ing friends and fam­i­ly. The choco­late chip cook­ies and choco­late cup­cakes have been their absolute favorites. So today I have a spe­cial treat… I want­ed to share with you my recipe for their #1 favorite — choco­late mini cakes. They are a skin-friend­ly dessert, mean­ing they fol­low the EBG “rules” for clear skin – they con­tain no grains and noth­ing high-glycemic that would spike your insulin and con­tribute to break­outs. Clear Skin Chocolate Mini Cakes {DRY INGREDIENTS} 2 cups almond flour (packed down to mea­sure) 1/2 cup unsweet­ened cocoa pow­der 2 tsp. alu­minum-free bak­ing soda 1/2 tsp. sea salt 1 tsp. cin­na­mon pow­der 1 cup coconut sug­ar (or brown sug­ar if you’re in a pinch) .….…… {WET INGREDIENTS} 1/2 cup coconut oil (or unsalt­ed grass-fed but­ter, soft­ened) 1 large omega-3 egg (prefer­ably soy-free, if you can get it) 1 tsp. vanil­la extract 1 can full-fat coconut milk** Paper or parch­ment bak­ing cups **Do not use the whole can of coconut milk. You want to refrig­er­ate the can for at least 4 hours or overnight, and scoop out the thick white cream that has sep­a­rat­ed from the water. Try not to scoop out the clear liquid/water with it – you just want to use the sep­a­rat­ed white cream. {HOW TO} Pre­heat oven to 350 degrees Fahren­heit (or 170–175 Cel­sius). Mix dry and wet ingre­di­ents in sep­a­rate bowls. Then mix both bowls of ingre­di­ents togeth­er. Blend well with a hand or stand mix­er. You should end up with a thick bat­ter, not run­ny. Put a dol­lop of bat­ter in each paper...