Best Dairy & Soy Substitutes

Best Dairy & Soy Substitutes

Dairy and soy often con­tribute to break­outs, due in part to the hor­mones present in the­se foods (and dairy’s ten­den­cy to spike insulin) that can dis­rupt your own hor­mon­al bal­ance. Acne is an inflam­ma­to­ry con­di­tion – you need to remove the cause of the inflam­ma­tion for the inflam­ma­tion to go down and the skin to heal. “…dairy still has casein (pro­tein) that looks like gluten to our immune sys­tem. That means…milk still stim­u­lates immune sys­tem prob­lems. For those with food allergies / sen­si­tiv­i­ties it is still a major prob­lem. Once sen­si­tized — always sen­si­tized. I avoid and strong­ly urge all with an a chron­ic dis­ease or autoim­mune dis­ease to AVOID.”– Dr. Ter­ry Wahls, M.D. Aside from sev­er­al stud­ies done in the past few years that show a marked decrease in acne after remov­ing dairy/soy/grains (not all at once), I have had hun­dreds of indi­vid­u­als email me that fol­low­ing the Epic Beau­ty Guide food guide­li­nes has com­plete­ly cleared up their skin. Don’t knock it til you try it! In case you’re unfa­mil­iar with the guide­li­nes, here is a brief overview (there are tons of detailed arti­cles on the site and in the book). Focus on fresh, whole, unprocessed foods as much as pos­si­ble. Think grass-fed meats, wild-caught seafood, organ­ic veg­gies, and organ­ic fruits. (Side Note: It’s not hard, it’s not bor­ing or taste­less, and it doesn’t take long to make your own fresh meal. It took me 10 min­utes to make din­ner last night, and it was a deli­cious grass-fed steak mar­i­nat­ed in fresh­ly minced gar­lic and spices, with steamed organ­ic broc­coli on the side. Deli­cious and super healthy.) Dairy and soy are com­mon...
Resources for Organic & Local Produce (and Avoid “Organic” Sourced in China)

Resources for Organic & Local Produce (and Avoid “Organic” Sourced in China)

There are many rea­sons to buy organ­i­cal­ly-grown, local pro­duce. One is that the food is fresh­er and often picked at its prop­er har­vest time (i.e. ripe instead of being picked weeks ear­ly and ripened off the vine or with chem­i­cal means), it’s often cheap­er, and it’s always a good idea to sup­port inde­pen­dent farms that are often small or fam­i­ly-run. Anoth­er great rea­son is that many farm­ers have switched over to organ­ic meth­ods, and you’ll find farm­ers that have always done things this way. USDA organ­ic reg­u­la­tions still allow for cer­tain chem­i­cal pes­ti­cides and so on, but a farmer who fol­lows a “beyond organ­ic” approach with­out any cer­ti­fi­ca­tion is fan­tas­tic and often cheap­er than the health store. Any­way, this post is a short one because I just want to share with you some good food resources AND an inves­ti­gate news report on Whole Foods being exposed for its sub-par sourcing of so-called “organ­ic” food. Check out the news video here. All the more rea­son to buy local. On a side­note, my grand­par­ents used to enjoy bust­ing my imag­i­nary balls about how they nev­er bought organ­ic and they turned out fine blah blah blah. Sound famil­iar? I told them, quite point­ed­ly, that they grew up with­out the option of organ­ic ver­sus con­ven­tion­al. All they had was organ­ic! It just wasn’t labelled that way because no one did it any dif­fer­ent­ly. (DDT and oth­er crap pes­ti­cides didn’t get put into use until about 1940.) Besides, there are just too many ben­e­fits to con­sum­ing foods grown with­out pes­ti­cides to even have an argu­ment about it. You can pre­tend all you want that those...
Epic Beauty Meal: Blueberry Coconut Pancakes with Peppered Eggs

Epic Beauty Meal: Blueberry Coconut Pancakes with Peppered Eggs

As my long-time read­ers know by now, I stick to a diet of grass-fed/pastured meats (it’s impor­tant not to sup­port fac­to­ry farm­ing), wild fish, organ­ic veg­gies and fruits, and some dessert when I feel like it (70%+ dark choco­late or paleo cook­ies any­one?). Even though there are no grains or dairy present, you can clear­ly see this is a deli­cious and sat­is­fy­ing way to eat. It is also what I rec­om­mend to read­ers and clients with skin issues like acne and eczema. The beau­ty about eat­ing this way (which I have cham­pi­oned since the incep­tion of this site in ’09), is that the skin responds so quick­ly and so well to it. It’s a beau­ti­fy­ing diet with­out even try­ing.   Blueberry Coconut Pancakes with Peppered Eggs This is an “Epic Beau­ty Guide Approved” beau­ty meal break­fast that will con­tribute to clear, glow­ing skin. It is gluten-free, grain-free, dairy-free, and has plen­ty of healthy fat, fiber, and pro­tein – exact­ly what you need to for your first meal of the day. Unlike oat­meal or sug­ary cere­al, this will keep you full for hours (for me, it lasts 4 hours, which is a mir­a­cle). P.S. A note about fat. Every­thing you have been taught about fat by the main­stream media is wrong (espe­cial­ly if you are an Amer­i­can). Fat is good for you. Fat does not make you fat (unless you’re eat­ing a ton of nuts/seeds every day). AND – gasp! – it is best to cook and fry in ani­mal fats like beef tal­low, bacon fat/grease, duck fat, etc. or coconut oil. They are extreme­ly sta­ble at high­er tem­per­a­tures and...
Mini-Post: Quick Tips for Not Getting Sick This Winter

Mini-Post: Quick Tips for Not Getting Sick This Winter

Hey every­one! I want­ed to get this post up in the hopes that it will help you dodge a cold or flu this sea­son. I’ve been using the­se quick tips for a looooong time and have not been sick with a cold or flu for 4 years (knock on wood har har). Here we go: 1. Nix the sug­ar. Sug­ar comes from sev­er­al sources, includ­ing refined white or brown sug­ar, raw sug­ar, grains, breads, pas­tries, and sug­ary fruit. Sug­ar is inflam­ma­to­ry and feeds path­o­gen­ic bac­te­ria and yeast, which also dis­rupts your healthy gut flo­ra that con­tributes heav­i­ly to the health of your immune sys­tem, there­by mak­ing your immune sys­tem weak­er and more sus­cep­ti­ble to sick­ness. Focus on eat­ing more healthy pro­teins and more healthy fats this sea­son, and you will find that you’ll nat­u­ral­ly eat less sug­ar when your plate is filled with a nice fish filet or grass-fed steak, and veg­gies. Now is a great time to eat an Epic Beau­ty Guide-style diet of grass-fed meats, wild-caught fish, veg­gies, and some low-sug­ar fruits like berries and green apples (no grains, little/no dairy). Your skin will also reward you with a pim­ple-free, glow­ing com­plex­ion. 2. Keep calm and car­ry on. Stress is an immune sys­tem neme­sis, but don’t stress about being stressed. Just take a moment to breathe, relax, read or watch inspi­ra­tional and stress-reduc­ing books or quotes or videos. What helped me change from a stressed out wor­ry­wart to a more calm, take-it-in-stride per­son? Yoga, books by Byron Katie and Eck­hart Tolle, and (inter­est­ing­ly enough) Steve Job’s Stan­ford com­mence­ment speech. Now I just do what needs to get done...

Tasty Skin-Clearing Green Drink

Hey every­one! I have always been impressed with the ben­e­fits of green tea, but could nev­er stand the taste of it plain. I would always order it and then some­one would say, “but Steph, remem­ber you don’t like green tea…” Oh yeah. Until I dis­cov­ered matcha. Matcha green tea is the dried, pow­dered ver­sion of green tea. It is grown in the shade (and/or moved to the shade for a few weeks pri­or to it being har­vest­ed), mak­ing for a sweet­er taste and more amino acids. Matcha con­tains a bevy of ben­e­fi­cial sub­stances, includ­ing the amino acid l-thea­nine, which has a calm­ing effect and mit­i­gates the effects of stress and cor­ti­sol on our bod­ies. Fur­ther, matcha low­ers cho­les­terol lev­els and pre­vents gly­ca­tion, which is respon­si­ble for loss of elas­tic­i­ty (wrin­kles, sag­ging) in our skin and dam­age to our organs. In 2003, researchers at Uni­ver­si­ty of Col­orado deter­mined that the “con­cen­tra­tion of epi­gal­lo­cat­e­ch­in gal­late (EGCG) avail­able from drink­ing matcha is 137 times greater than the amount of EGCG avail­able from Chi­na Green Tips green tea, and at least three times high­er than the largest lit­er­a­ture val­ue for oth­er green teas” (empha­sis mine). In case you’re won­der­ing, EGCG is the can­cer-inhibit­ing, anti-inflam­ma­to­ry, neu­ro­pro­tec­tive antiox­i­dant that com­pris­es 60% of matcha. When you pur­chase matcha, make sure it’s cer­e­mo­ni­al grade because you will get the most bang for your buck – the most amino acids, the most EGCG, the best and sweet­est fla­vor, etc. Matcha has a great taste on its own, but my favorite way to con­sume it is in the form of a deli­cious lat­te. Check out my very own EBG green lat­te...

Talking Beauty with Sarah Fragoso + Cookbook GIVEAWAY! (Closed)

Hey every­one! Today I have an awe­some inter­view with Sarah Fragoso, author of the super pop­u­lar Every­day Paleo web­site and Every­day Paleo cook­book. She is one of my favorite paleo folks – she’s a work­ing, trav­el­ing, super busy mum of 3 boys and main­tains a fan­tas­tic diet and exer­cise rou­tine for her­self and her fam­i­ly. Her cook­book is also an excel­lent tool for any­one want­i­ng to fol­low an Epic Beau­ty Guide-style diet for clear skin, since her recipes are quick and tasty. Annnnd…we’re giv­ing away a copy of her cook­book! Keep read­ing… 1. Your cook­book is a favorite in my house­hold col­lec­tion. How long did it take you com­pile this tome and what was your favorite part of cre­at­ing it? It took me almost a year to cre­ate and com­pile Every­day Paleo.  My favorite part of cre­at­ing it was the sim­ple fact that this was a fam­i­ly project.  My hus­band and my chil­dren were all extreme­ly involved, inter­est­ed, and hon­est through­out the process and I could not have done it with­out their lov­ing sup­port. 2. If you could pick one recipe from Every­day Paleo, which one would you say is your favorite? My per­son­al favorite would have to be the Steak Chile Rel­lenos but my fam­i­lies absolute favorite is hands down the Every­day Meat­loaf. 3. You have three adorable sons and are in great shape. Could you tell us how you got fit post-preg­nan­cy? Chang­ing my eat­ing habits was num­ber one in my phys­i­cal trans­for­ma­tion. For fit­ness I worked out twice a week at Nor­cal Strength and Con­di­tion­ing under the guid­ance of Robb Wolf and his amaz­ing wife Nicki Vio­let­ti. I...