6 Spices & Herbs that Help Fight Acne and Eczema

6 Spices & Herbs that Help Fight Acne and Eczema

6 Spices & Herbs That Help Fight Acne & Eczema

Hey every­one! I hope you are all gear­ing up to have an amaz­ing week­end. I have been doing a lot more cook­ing late­ly and research­ing into the most ben­e­fi­cial spices and herbs for our health (which then trans­lates into clear, healthy skin). Below are 6 top “clear skin” spices that you can start incor­po­rat­ing into your dai­ly life to help you fight acne:

{LICORICE}
Ben­e­fit: Anti-inflam­ma­to­ry. Has the abil­i­ty to increase the nat­u­ral steroid out­put by the adren­al glands, which is great for peo­ple with adren­al fatigue and inflam­ma­tion (i.e. eczema, pso­ri­a­sis, acne).
How to Use: Try 1–2 cups of licorice tea per day or a pre­pared tinc­ture (Cedar Bear Nat­u­rales makes great tinc­tures). As a safe­ty pre­cau­tion, do not take licorice for more than 7 days at a time – give it a rest in cycles (7 days on, 7 days off) and try to avoid long-term usage unless you are super­vised by a natur­opath, inte­gra­tive doc­tor, or oth­er physi­cian.

{TURMERIC}
Ben­e­fit: Antiox­i­dant and anti-inflam­ma­to­ry. Turmer­ic is 5–8 times stronger than antiox­i­dant vit­a­mins C and E. Turmer­ic is also able to neu­tral­ize the hydrox­yl rad­i­cal, which is con­sid­ered one of the most (if not the most) destruc­tive and reac­tive of all oxi­dants. Cur­cum­in is respon­si­ble for turmeric’s anti-inflam­ma­to­ry prop­er­ties and it inhibits the activ­i­ty of enzymes that are respon­si­ble for inflam­ma­tion.
How to Use: Make turmer­ic tea, make a chick­en or seafood cur­ry with an Indi­an cur­ry spice mix (which con­tains turmer­ic), or take turmer­ic cap­sules (I take 2 Par­adise Herbs turmer­ic cap­sules per day).

{BLACK PEPPER}
Ben­e­fit:
Increas­es the bioavail­abil­i­ty of just about all oth­er foods and com­pounds, par­tic­u­lar­ly cur­cum­in (found in turmer­ic — see above).
How to Use: Put a pinch or two (or three) in your meals or to your deli­cious Indi­an cur­ry (see above).

{CLOVES}
Ben­e­fit:
Anti-inflam­ma­to­ry, antibac­te­ri­al, antiox­i­dant. May help mus­cle pains and arthri­tis pain. Clove con­tains eugenol, a mild anes­thet­ic use­ful for tooth and gum pain, and sore throats. Clove also assists with asth­ma and bron­chi­tis. Per­haps most notably, clove elim­i­nates intesti­nal par­a­sites, fungi, and unfriend­ly bac­te­ria.
How to Use: Put 1–3 drops of clove oil in a tall glass of water or non-plas­tic water bot­tle, which is some­thing I do a lot. It adds a nice spicy taste and is sur­pris­ing­ly refresh­ing. You can cer­tain­ly put more than 3 drops in once you’ve got­ten used to it, but don’t over­load — too much and you could get stom­ach upset. Clove is often used in spice mix­es and tea mix­es as well, or you can get cloves (they are a small, dried flow­er that looks brown and sharp) and grind them fresh for use in your dish­es.

{GINGER}
Ben­e­fit:
Anti-inflam­ma­to­ry. Elim­i­nates gas/bloating and soothes the intesti­nal tract. Also boosts the immune sys­tem. Gin­ger also low­ers cho­les­terol lev­els and pre­vents the oxi­da­tion of low den­si­ty lipopro­tein (LDL), effec­tive­ly pre­vent­ing vas­cu­lar dis­ease.
How to Use: Get some fresh gin­ger and grate it into food as it’s cook­ing, juice a small knob of gin­ger into your veg­etable juice, or sprin­kle gin­ger pow­der in your meals. You can also use bot­tled gin­ger juice in cook­ing. Gin­ger ale (as long as it’s all nat­u­ral, preser­v­a­tive-free, etc.) and gin­ger tea are oth­er options.

{CINNAMON}
Ben­e­fit:
Anti-inflam­ma­to­ry. May help pain and stiff­ness of mus­cles and joints. Helps to pre­vent uri­nary tract infec­tions and mouth issues (gum dis­ease, decay, etc.). Sev­er­al stud­ies, includ­ing one done by the Human Nutri­tion Research Cen­ter (an off-shoot of the USDA), found that cin­na­mon con­tains a com­pound that low­ers your blood sug­ar, which in turn helps to sta­bi­lize weight and low­er inflam­ma­tion (there­by help­ing skin issues like acne and eczema).
How to Use: Add 1/4 — 1 tea­spoon of cin­na­mon to your food or drinks.

I hope you enjoy the­se herbs/spices and the excel­lent rea­sons to use them. If you have any herbs/spices you like to use or any recipes to share, def­i­nite­ly leave a com­ment!
~Steph  x

9 Comments

  1. Hey Stephanie, do you have any advice on how to light­en dark lips? My low­er lip is a nat­u­ral pink, but the upper lip is notice­ably a lot dark­er (kin­da brown) so I’m pret­ty sure it’s not nat­u­ral­ly like that. I have an olive com­plex­ion so it stands out a lot. None of my siblings/parents have a dark­er upper lip. Let me know! Thanks. 

    Reply
  2. Hi Stephanie,

    I think it’s only been a week or ten days that I have start­ed watch­ing your videos and read­ing your blogs on skin care and it seems that I have become a very big fan of yours. You are doing a great job Dear! Stuff that would have cost us heaps of mon­ey and lots of effort is now unrav­eled by you and it’s just a few clicks away. I real­ly appre­ci­ate it. I have been try­ing to note down things that are help­ful for my skin (which is oily but not too much) and nat­u­ral prod­ucts that are sug­gest­ed by you. Is it pos­si­ble for you to sug­gest me some Indi­an nat­u­ral prod­ucts that you may be aware of which will real­ly help my skin. Or may be some of your Indi­an view­ers can help me with this as they see my com­ment. Thanks a lot again:) Sushi 

    Reply
  3. Hi Steph, what’s wrong with tak­ing licorice tea for too long? Will it over-stim­u­late the adren­a­line glands? 

    Reply
    • Hi Vivi,

      In a way, yes. Gly­cyrrhiz­in, the active com­pound in licorice, can cause over­sen­si­tiv­i­ty to hor­mones and result in oth­er side effects like headaches, blood pres­sure reg­u­la­tion issues, and water reten­tion. It is a won­der­ful herb, but like all med­i­c­i­nal herbs, they need to be used care­ful­ly and prefer­ably under super­vi­sion of a natur­opath or inte­gra­tive physi­cian.

      ~Steph x

      Reply
  4. Hi Steph, thanks for the reply… I guess I bet­ter take it spar­ing­ly then. Natur­opath charge very expen­sive fees in Sin­ga­pore, so unfor­tu­nate­ly, I might not get the chance to con­sult one any­time soon. Cheers! Love­ly skin! ^^ 

    Reply
    • No prob­lem, Vivi. 🙂 Yes, take it in mod­er­a­tion and you can either cycle it one week off, one week on, or take it for 4 weeks in a row and give it a break for at least 4 weeks. Either way, pay close atten­tion to your body. 

      ~Steph x

      Reply
  5. Hi I love all your posts . I was won­der­ing if you ever heard or tried Nu Skin prod­ucts. Of not can you go and check them out online and see if there good to use( with­out harsh chem­i­cals ) thank you 

    Reply
  6. Is it nor­mal that I can’t see you last arti­cle any­more (about your diet & fit­ness rou­tine)? What a pity! 

    Reply
  7. Hi Stephanie! Thanks for the arti­cle and inter­est­ing tips. I have suf­fered from bad eczema since I was a child and I am con­stant­ly search­ing the web for any new tips that might help. After using ste­ri­od cream through child­hood my skin has become weak, thin, eas­i­ly irri­tat­ed and sen­si­tive. I there­fore now believe that any nat­u­ral pro­duct is best for the skin. So i’m inter­est­ed in the spices you men­tion — I have used cin­na­mon before but I am keen to try the Licorice tea you describe. Where is the best place to get this? As I have had good results from oth­er anti-inflam­ma­to­ry spices I have high hopes for this! I also take aloe vera tablets which are anti-bac­te­ri­al, which have huge ben­e­fits for many aspects of health. Tak­ing tablets is bet­ter for your skin than putting aloe vera gel on as gel often has many preser­v­a­tives in it which can cause a reac­tion to the skin! I also hear that grape seed tablets work wonders…I’ll be try­ing that next! Any­way I hope the­se are some use­ful tips for you, and I look for­ward to try­ing the Licorice Tea. 

    Reply

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